Comments for The Prepper Journal http://www.theprepperjournal.com Prepping, Survival and Common Sense Wed, 28 Jan 2015 11:07:00 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Comment on Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle by Pat Henryhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/27/cookstoves-prepared-lifestyle/comment-page-1/#comment-22681 Wed, 28 Jan 2015 11:07:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12995#comment-22681 The have labeled our breath as a health risk, so why not. I would love to have a cookstove in my home, but there is no place for it unless I remove a lot of cabinetry first and my marriage second. If I was building a new home as we have talked about, I would love to have one. Of course I would want a wood burning stove also (overkill?) but can’t retrofit my home for that easily either.

I have started to look into products like Central Boiler. Anyone have experience with getting one installed? http://www.centralboiler.com/

Pat

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Comment on What Type of Firewood is Best? by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle - Patriot Risinghttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2014/01/16/what-type-of-firewood-is-best/comment-page-1/#comment-22680 Wed, 28 Jan 2015 03:20:53 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=6140#comment-22680 […] you’ve got the time and energy, cutting your own firewood for the winter is one of the most rewarding aspects of living in a cold climate, both mentally and […]

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Comment on After the Freeze Dried Food is Gone by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle | disasterdefense.ushttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/03/26/after-the-freeze-dried-food-is-gone/comment-page-1/#comment-22679 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:15:10 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=1462#comment-22679 […] you prepare your already stored food. And it’s just as well, because no matter how you ration it that food will eventually run out. If you’re to survive through self-reliance and meet all the dietary needs of the human body, […]

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Comment on Blackout! – Power Outage Checklist by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle | disasterdefense.ushttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/10/23/blackout-power-outage-checklist/comment-page-1/#comment-22678 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 23:14:44 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=4844#comment-22678 […] If you have a woodstove or wood cookstove, chances are you’ve never worried about this situation. If you lose power and have to rely on yourself for heat, all you need to do is grab a couple blocks of firewood, […]

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Comment on Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle by usmarinestankerhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/27/cookstoves-prepared-lifestyle/comment-page-1/#comment-22677 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:55:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12995#comment-22677 Thanks Chris, a wood cook stove is on my radar now. I love all this learning. I’m on my iPod so I can’t cite links efficiently, but Utah is working on a wood burning ban unless you register and prove that your home is solely heated by wood (deq.utah.gov and click links home-topics-burning wood-rules). I think this will be as dangerous as registering guns.

The evidence cited for this ban supposedly comes from university studies (cachevalleydaily.com “Herbert defends proposed wood burning ban”) and claims that wood burning pollution accounts for an earth-ending 5% of toltal aerosolized pollutants. They also make the dubious claim that burning one log equals driving about 600 highway miles.

These claims are made yet refineries are allowed to go full blast and the BLM conducts controlled burning on hundreds of acres yearly. Utah does have a unique pollution problem along the ‘wasatch front’ of that same mountain range wherein an inversion holds pollution over the cities between the rocks and the fetid great salt lake, but I think there are other solutions than legislating people’s home lives.

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Comment on After the Freeze Dried Food is Gone by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle | Home Preppershttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/03/26/after-the-freeze-dried-food-is-gone/comment-page-1/#comment-22676 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:01:48 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=1462#comment-22676 […] you prepare your already stored food. And it’s just as well, because no matter how you ration it that food will eventually run out. If you’re to survive through self-reliance and meet all the dietary needs of the human body, […]

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Comment on Blackout! – Power Outage Checklist by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle | Home Preppershttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/10/23/blackout-power-outage-checklist/comment-page-1/#comment-22675 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:01:19 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=4844#comment-22675 […] If you have a woodstove or wood cookstove, chances are you’ve never worried about this situation. If you lose power and have to rely on yourself for heat, all you need to do is grab a couple blocks of firewood, […]

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Comment on Blackout! – Power Outage Checklist by 5 Things You Need to Go Off Grid Now – Pt. 5 | Home Preppershttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/10/23/blackout-power-outage-checklist/comment-page-1/#comment-22674 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:00:36 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=4844#comment-22674 […] a backup source of power is important if some event or circumstances take down the power grid. In the example of the anticipated blizzard in New England, power could be lost for millions making […]

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Comment on The AK-47 vs AR-15: Which Rifle is Better? by Pat Henryhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2014/03/11/ak-47-vs-ar-15-which-rifle-is-better/comment-page-1/#comment-22673 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:42:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=6881#comment-22673 Great comments! Thanks William.

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Comment on 5 Things You Need to Go Off Grid Now – Pt. 5 by Pat Henryhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/26/5-things-need-go-off-grid-now-pt-5/comment-page-1/#comment-22672 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 13:40:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12985#comment-22672 I know what you mean Matt.

I have considered the value in learning skills like this but not as a replacement for my current job for the same reasons you mention. My mortgage still needs to be paid so for now, I am married to electricity. I could say that once everything is paid off, I could move into something like this, but again, how would I pay the bills with a skill that doesn’t make any money.

I completely agree that skills like this would be vital in a collapse of society, but I don’t know if they would be useful as a job more so than self preservation if the disaster was horrific. If we have no electricity, I don’t think there are going to be too many jobs building homes for a long time. Lumberjack skills would definitely help you fell trees, but I doubt you would be working for a company. You might be working for your fireplace.

Skills like leather-working could be extremely valuable because you can make items to sell (hats, holsters, jackets, gloves, shoes) or to clothe yourself and that seems to be a great direction to focus on because you can keep this as a hobby while still maintaining a “regular” job.

It really just comes down to what happens and how bad it gets. If something cataclysmic happens and we are all forced back to the pioneer days, I think it ill take decades to come back around and people will just be trying to survive until then, but that is only my guess.

Pat

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Comment on What Type of Firewood is Best? by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle | WV Preppershttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2014/01/16/what-type-of-firewood-is-best/comment-page-1/#comment-22669 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 11:18:38 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=6140#comment-22669 […] by If you’ve got the time and energy, cutting your own firewood for the winter is one of the most rewarding aspects of living in a cold climate, both mentally and […]

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Comment on After the Freeze Dried Food is Gone by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle - Freedom's Floodgateshttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/03/26/after-the-freeze-dried-food-is-gone/comment-page-1/#comment-22668 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 11:16:25 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=1462#comment-22668 […] prepare your already stored food. And it’s just as well, because no matter how you ration it that food will eventually run out. If you’re to survive through self-reliance and meet all the dietary needs of the human body, […]

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Comment on What Type of Firewood is Best? by Cookstoves and the Prepared Lifestyle - Freedom's Floodgateshttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2014/01/16/what-type-of-firewood-is-best/comment-page-1/#comment-22667 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 11:15:59 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=6140#comment-22667 […] by If you’ve got the time and energy, cutting your own firewood for the winter is one of the most rewarding aspects of living in a cold climate, both mentally and […]

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Comment on The AK-47 vs AR-15: Which Rifle is Better? by William Kevin Styershttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2014/03/11/ak-47-vs-ar-15-which-rifle-is-better/comment-page-1/#comment-22666 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 01:51:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=6881#comment-22666 When we talk about reliability issues between the two rifles what we are really talking about is piston versus direct impingement. Direct impingement can be a finnicky system by its very nature. You are essentially funneling hot gas, and whatever unspent powder and particulates it carries, through a very narrow aperture to create pressure against the bolt carrier to move the action. The very narrow part is the key there. Over time, and without proper maintenance, that narrow aperture can become clogged resulting in feeding malfunctions at best.

If we are talking about a prepper end of days scenario then it follows that proper maintenance equipment will become increasingly difficult to come by. The tight tolerances and precision machining that make the AR platform rifles such capable battlefield weapons will become a liability as routine maintenance becomes more difficult to perform in an environment that has lost much of the industrialized base that we have come to rely on for our military hardware. There is a reason our military trains soldiers to be armorers and makes sure every solider is familiar with how to maintain their weapon. There is a reason we maintain the logistics to make sure our soldiers have basic cleaning and maintenance supplies even in the field.

In a post collapse society you would not longer have people manufacturing gun oil or swabs. There would be supplies but those supplies would essentially be finite and it would be in those days where the AK would shine. It lacks the tight tolerances of the AR and most importantly it is piston driven. Pistons can still become fouled but repairing a fouled piston and gas tube is head and shoulders easier than getting the fouling out of a direct impingement system. You can clean the whole apparatus with a tube sock and a sturdy stick if you had to. The AK won’t win you any awards for long range marksmanship with its clunky, loose tolerances. Hell anyone who has ever fired one can’t tell me with a straight face that the first time they heard the dust cover rattle under the force of the action that they didn’t wonder, just a little bit, if the rifle wasn’t about to fly apart. Those loosely machined tolerances can actually accommodate a little bit of crud without seizing up. AR platform rifles tend to be a little less forgiving of grit and grime. If you have the supplies and ability to maintain it a direct impingement AR is a fine and obviously battle proven rifle that will do what you need it to do. The AK, on the other hand, has shown time and time again that it can perform under harsh conditions with rudimentary maintenance in an relatively unskilled operator’s hands and still be an effective weapon. Of course the best of both worlds would be a piston action AR.

On the subject of ammo, which is hardly even a talking point since you can pretty much make an AR chamber whatever you want so long as you put the parts into it, if I had to choose between 5.56 and 7.62 in a prepper survival situation I’d pick the 7.62. The larger round is just more effective against unarmored opponents and light cover, which is what I imagine you would be faced up against in a prepper/survival scenario.

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Comment on Could the Survival Bike be your Bug Out Vehicle of Choice? by BobWhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/14/the-survival-bike-your-bug-out-vehicle-of-choice/comment-page-1/#comment-22665 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 01:09:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12734#comment-22665 This topic and conversation got me thinking of what might make a viable 2-wheel transport. Expensive mopeds seem ridiculous in light of what a person would want to carry vs off-paved road movement when the golden horde takes foot.

The Trail 90/110 are indeed viable bumblers, but lack any kind of accelleration to get away from danger…especially under a load. The Grandparents used them for hunting, and while they are nearly bulletproof, the lack of stopping power, and suspension travel makes it similar to riding a hard-tail in the woods.

I’d consider a mid 80s-turn of the century Honda XR 200/250/400/600/650 or Kawasaki KLR 250/650 as far better choices. These bikes are far more dirt capable with decent braking, and far more modern suspension systems to be able to tame rough fields, stream crossings, hilly, and mountainous terrain. The US Army has used different models from these product lines for scouts in the field, so they can be made very quiet while retaining enough power to still get moving quickly.

A recent Craigslist crawl found the KLRs (street legal) to really hold their residual value, so for cheaper options, the off-road only XRs should be a more cost effective option for if/when rules break down.

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Comment on 5 Things You Need to Go Off Grid Now – Pt. 4 by usmarinestankerhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/24/5-things-need-go-off-grid-now-pt-4/comment-page-1/#comment-22664 Tue, 27 Jan 2015 00:10:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12966#comment-22664 Thanks Skipper for the link – that will give me some much enjoyable reading at work tomorrow. My congratulations and accolades for making that sort of choice and investment. I envy you being at a point where you can afford the land and are working it to build a dream or a place of security for your loved ones. Absolutely awesome.

I wish there were more blogs out there showcasing the nitty gritty, sweaty, dirt-under-your-nails hard work from day one on untamed land. Your trials and errors will educate many. Thank you.

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Comment on 5 Things You Need to Go Off Grid Now – Pt. 5 by usmarinestankerhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/26/5-things-need-go-off-grid-now-pt-5/comment-page-1/#comment-22663 Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:03:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12985#comment-22663 Electricity…such a double edged sword. It makes our lives so convenient and safe yet it really isn’t needed for life except for the fact we have engineered our lives to depend on it. It’s like running water, sewage, refrigeration, and cars – all these things used to be luxuries, but without them you can’t function in this society, and lack of basic utilities can get child protective services called on you and your kids kidnapped by the government “for their safety”.

I personally think its more bane than boon for humanity – a type of Pandora’s Box or Tower of Babel if you will. It can do miraculous things and without it we’d all be living much harder and possibly shorter lives, but we tend to give up so much of what makes us human so we can be plugged in. It isn’t electricity itself with which I take issue; it is just a tool. Rather, it is how we choose to use it, like an addiction, which bothers me.

Pat, and any other readers for that matter, have you ever seriously considered professions or learning trades which don’t rely on electricity? That’s intended to be a discussion prompting question and not a judgmental one. It would really mean a fundamental change to the way we live, but would probably leave us better prepared if the grid actually did go down. The biggest problems I see with it is that such professions usually don’t pay as well (which would hinder prepping) and really don’t have a place in mainstream society currently (building furniture by hand, etc).

When I wrote “What Value Do You Bring to a Survival Situation?” ( http://www.theprepperjournal.com/2014/07/30/value-bring-survival-situation/ ) I briefly touched on the notion of trades and skills which are not powered by modern conveniences. I can make some items from leather, but how useful is that, really? I’d be much better off if I was a professional lumberjack or cabin builder / house framer to generate income if the grid goes down. As it stands, I’m going to have to ride the huge learning curve along with everyone else. In my opinion, the more off-grid skills we learn and practice now will serve us better than electricity if the interruption in services is more than a hiccup of a couple weeks.

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Comment on 5 Things You Need to Go Off Grid Now – Pt. 4 by Capt. William E Simpsonhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/24/5-things-need-go-off-grid-now-pt-4/comment-page-1/#comment-22657 Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:19:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12966#comment-22657 Xploregon:

Window films merely keep the glass fragments from a shattering window from going everywhere; basically attempting to mimic car safety glass (post manufacture). Tempered glass tends to shatter in a more behaved manner than plain glass as well. If that’s your goal, look into untinted auto safety glass. However, is sounds like you might be seeking a little ballistic protection? If so, you need to add a layer(s) of Polycarbonate Plastic, which is sold under various tradenames. And using standard off the shelf Polycarb to stop projectiles, you’ll need at least 1/2 inch thick for small caliber pistol rounds (9mm, .22, .380, etc)… If you’re really serious, then you need the ballistic grade of Polycarb that is available here:

http://www.eplastics.com/Lexan_Bullet_Resistant_Polycarbonate_Sheet

I talk at more length about ballistic windows and walls in my current book The Nautical Prepper… Pat Henry has a link to that on his webpage here…

BTW: ON THE SUBJECT OF ‘Going Off-Grid’ .. For those folks interested in our actual Off-Grid project (yes, we’re doing/done that) here is a link to my own series which provides some usable info.

http://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/kt-living-off-the-grid-starting-from-scratch/

I am putting together a book (about 300 pages with over 2-doz photos), based upon our actual DIY first-hand experience starting from scratch, where we bought 150 acres of raw land in a remote wilderness area that we have made into our retreat, where we live totally OFF-GRID with lions, bears, deer, elk, etc… Going-Off grid is not to be taken lightly; it’s a very serious proposition that transcends mere arms-length academic musings. My online series, which itself is over 12,000 words (about 25% of a book) with photos of the project, just scratches the surface. This is why I decided to write a book…

Cheers! Capt. Bill

Capt. William E. Simpson II – USMM Ret.
Semper Veritas / Semper Paratus

http://www.WilliameSimpson.com
IMDb: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6505899/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NauticalPrepper
Member: Authors Guild

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Comment on 5 Things You Need to Go Off Grid Now – Pt. 4 by Pat Henryhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2015/01/24/5-things-need-go-off-grid-now-pt-4/comment-page-1/#comment-22655 Mon, 26 Jan 2015 14:12:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12966#comment-22655 Yes, the higher millimeter rating would be thicker films, but I don’t know if that would necessarily make them harder to install. They would definitely be more expensive.

There is some good information on 3M’s site about their different offerings
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Window_Film/Solutions/Markets-Products/Residential/Safety-Security_Window_Films/

but I would also look at the ratings on Amazon for some additional feedback and perspecitve. They also offer the 3M window installation kit and I can’t believe this is that difficult to do. http://www.amazon.com/s/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&field-keywords=security%20window%20film&linkCode=ur2&sprefix=security%20window%20film%2Caps%2C266&tag=theprejou-20&url=search-alias%3Dtools&linkId=VIFSQYTBYEY6VB7C

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Comment on 7 Ways to Lighten Your Bug Out Bag by Dcsouthgwhttp://www.theprepperjournal.com/2014/12/17/7-ways-lighten-bug-bag/comment-page-1/#comment-22654 Mon, 26 Jan 2015 06:50:00 +0000 http://www.theprepperjournal.com/?p=12392#comment-22654 1+ The point on multi purpose items, getting practical experience on what is in your bag, and systematically honing what works and what doesn’t. That has been a part of lightweight backpacking for decades. Two of my favorite items that fall into the category of buying quality to reduce weight are the gatewood cape from six moons designs and the sierra sniveller from Jacks R Better. Just ask Ray Jardine.

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