The Lone Wolf VS The Survival Group

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I came across an article on the INCH Survival site that was originally posted in May. In this article, the author discusses the pro’s and con’s of joining a survival group as opposed to simply going it alone. The article raises some good points, but the concept isn’t only for survival groups. Anytime you are dealing with other people you will have to accommodate their personalities. You will get their strengths and be subjected to their weaknesses. One thing I thought about after reading this post was for a lot of us, our families will be our survival groups and I don’t believe they will act any differently than friends or strangers in the same scenario.

Consider this, a disaster has occurred in the United States and virtually everyone is affected. There is no hope anywhere and no assistance. For all practical purposes you will be on your own for shelter, security and survival. Family members will likely bond in times like this so your survival group might be Aunt Doris who never really saw you much more than at family events. Another member might be your second cousins that you only know through Christmas dinners and word of mouth. Does the fact that these people are blood relations change how they will act in a crisis? Are family members any more trustworthy than your neighbor, or a stranger?

I personally don’t believe the Lone Wolf will ever last long in a major crisis. Could they hang tough and make it through the first/worst part of the disaster because they have some training, resources and the will to survive? Probably. I imagine a lot of people would, but eventually anyone who cares for their survival will want to be part of a larger group and all the problems of people together in bad situations will be shared regardless of your relations.

I think a valid thing to consider is how you as someone who is interested in Prepping will adapt when your sphere of influence or responsibility grows due to a tragedy. Have you given this any thought? Knowing what you know gives you one set of advantages, but the same people you swore you wouldn’t become (the sheeple) could easily be part of your group and under your care without you even trying. This isn’t so much a debate about who will share supplies as it is relationships with other people in crisis. When those people are your family, what considerations will you be forced to consider as the leader in your group?

Read the article: The Lone Wolf VS The Survival Group and let me know your thoughts.

 

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22 Comments on "The Lone Wolf VS The Survival Group"

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Jack Bower
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Basically my entire family (the ones I care about, anyway) lives within 5 miles of one another. None of them, save for my brother, have any skills or materials that can help in a SHTF scenario. Still, I am an animal subject to the programming of my selfish genes and so I would do all I could to preserve their lives. That established, a certain shift in power would have to take place. If I am sharing my crop, my solar power, my books, my tools, my food, water, and medicine, then they would have to accept that I have… Read more »
Pat Henry
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Do you watch the Walking Dead? At the end of one of the seasons Rick, the lead character essentially told everyone that he was done playing games and it was his way from now on or they could leave. This was the beginning of what they jokingly referred to as the Ricktatorship and I can see something similar happening in situations like you mention. When it comes to voting, I would feel the same way I think with almost every decision. There might be some I wouldn’t care about, but anything I thought was worth a fight over I probably… Read more »
Jack Bower
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Hey Pat Nah, not into zombies, so I never watched TWD. But you do raise a good point: how do you punish one of your own? Honestly, I would think that it would depend on his “crime” but once again I would be the final arbiter of justice. If, for example, he were to hoard or steal food from the group then that would be some serious physical labor as punishment. If he did something that ended in a death…well, I never really liked cousin Joe anyway. I wouldn’t execute him, but nor could he continue to be a threat… Read more »
Pat Henry
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Banished from the Island! One I have thought of too, but how do you keep Joe from coming back? What if he does a week or two later with a gunshot or broken leg, or a bunch of bad guys? What about Joe’s mother who is still there and isn’t too happy to see her only beloved banished. This gets all kinds of messy really fast and I don’t know how it would all work out in a dictatorship. For this type of scenario I could see coming up with community rules and laws that everyone would need to agree… Read more »
Jack Bower
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All valid points and you’re right – it is good to form a group ahead of time and flesh out these rules in advance. Or, if your family is like mine, establish them ASAFP after TSHTF during TEOTWAWKI…..LMNOP.

Rayan Alam
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I don’t have much of a family close by. I’d probably be a lone wolf unless I got with a few friends (a few of them have decent survival skills).
I would never just group with a stranger unless they saved my life because one second they’re cool the next theyre stabbing/shooting you

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