Quantcast
728x90
Prepper Gear Auctions
728x90

Help Your Chickens Lay More Eggs

  • Pin It
Chickens
Print Friendly

Editors Note: As we begin construction on our own chicken coop this week, I came across this article on the Ready Store Blog and wanted to share. This has some great and practical tips for making your chickens happy and stress free, which leads to more eggs.

 

If you start to raise chickens to be more self-sufficient, you want them to be as productive as possible. But what if they aren’t laying as many eggs as you’d hoped?

The most common reasons that chickens aren’t laying eggs is because they are too young, too old, the hours of daylight are too short, it is molting or the feeding is not of sufficient nutritional value. You might not be able to affect those first points, but you can help contribute to a stress-free environment for your chickens while keeping them healthy and well.

Chickens will typically lay one egg or less during a day and that will decrease with age. Their egg-laying years will typically last for 2-3 years.

- Check out these high-quality chicken coops – 

If you are experiencing a low yield of eggs from your chickens, check out these tips below to see what you can do to help them lay more eggs.

Quality Feed
You don’t have to go crazy with some cutting-edge feed that’s guaranteed to make your chickens produce eggs the size of a garden gnome. It’s recommended that you use a diet of premium laying mash or pellet, along with occasional fresh fruit. vegetables, meal worms and other healthy treats. If you’re going to change your chicken’s feed, do it gradually substituting it in slowly.

Clean Nests Boxes
One of the most important factors to helping chickens lay eggs is a clean nesting box area with comfortable bedding. You can also make a soft surface with recycled-newspaper pellets which also are easy to toss and replace.

Open Areas
The idea behind free-range chickens is that if they are more comfortable, they will produce more healthy eggs. While free-range chickens might not be a possibility for some urban homesteaders, it’s a great idea to have a larger area with enough area for the chickens to graze on a lawn while still being protected from hawks or other predators.

Calcium
Egg-laying takes a lot of calcium from a hen’s body. Be sure to provide them enough calcium in their diet to keep a steady flow of eggs. Besides a high-quality feed, you might consider mixing crushed oyster shells in a cup of of feed. Or even placing a cup of oyster shells in the coop for the chickens to eat when they need it.

Inspect Regularly
Try to handle your hens often checking for problems. If they have large cuts, broken bones, etc. it will give you a better idea of how you can help. Are they uncomfortable? Have they been pestered by predators? Handling your hens on a regular basis will help you know how to best help them.

Coop Security
Along with the previous point, make sure your coop is secure from predators. Make sure that animals like raccoons, cats and other animals can’t burrow or find their way into the coop.

Fresh Water
To stay healthy, chickens need constant access to water. Change the water every day. It might be a chore to do it every day but it will lead to healthier chickens who will lay more eggs.

Parasite Control
Parasites love to prey on chickens. Mites are the most common and can take control of your coop without you even realizing it. Make it a habit to inspect your chickens at night when mites are most active. Mites are small, reddish-brown insect that scurry around a chicken’s head. If you do have a mite infestation, use a dose of ivermectin (available from a veterinarian) for each chicken.

What Have You Found?
How have you helped your chickens lay more eggs? Comment below to help us know what we can do to make our chickens more productive.


If you found this article useful, please Vote for The Prepper Journal as a top prepper web site.

Copyright Information This information has been made available by The Prepper Journal. Content on this site (unless the work of a third-party) may be shared freely in digital form, in part or whole, for non-commercial use with a link back to this site crediting the author. All links in articles must remain intact as originally posted in order to be republished. If you would like to be notified of new articles, contests and Prepper news, please sign up for our daily newsletter, follow us on Twitter, or Like Us on Facebook.

Google

5 Comments

  1. AZDevilDog

    April 26, 2013 at 7:07 pm

    Thanks for the link to the chicken coops Pat. Going next month to help the folks rebuild their coop and add some more outside area to it.

  2. Prosta Chudo

    January 22, 2014 at 2:59 am

    I took egg shells and put them in a blender. then I would take whatever fI was giving them and add a bit of water (NOT TOO MUCH) and blend the two together. I was getting up to 5 eggs a day with one hen after doing this. it completely made laying mash obsolete.

    • Pat Henry

      January 22, 2014 at 11:13 am

      What type of hen was laying 5 eggs a day? I have to get a couple of those!

      • Anthony Fennell

        February 27, 2014 at 3:23 pm

        I honestly dont remember their breed. We got them at our local feed store. It was between 1 and 5 a day. I was quite shocked myself. worth a shot with new hens. blend the shells into the feed

        • P. Henry

          February 27, 2014 at 3:49 pm

          We are getting 2 Orpingtons and 2 Barred Rocks next month for some additional capacity and color. It will be nice to have brown eggs mixed in with our Leghorn’s.

          Pat

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>